Egypt Archaeology

Google Earth Discovers New Pyramids?

Giant 'pyramid'

Google earth image of supposed pyramid taken from news.com.au

Mounds of sand spotted in the Egyptian desert using Google Earth could be the site of long lost pyramids. In 2012  American researcher Angela Micol  announced that  new and undiscovered pyramids were in the Egyptian desert.  She claimed that through using Google earth she found these pyramids. http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/more-pyramids-uncovered-by-google-earth-search/story-e6frfq80-1226449900356

Her findings  were met with much criticism by scholars  who dismissed the images as nothing more than anomalies and wind formed sand formations. Since then American archaeologists have used satellite imagery to discover 17 buried pyramids in Egypt as well as a thousand tombs and 3000 buildings from the time of the Pharaohs.  http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/american-archaeologists-discover-17-buried-pyramids-in-egypt/story-e6frfq80-1226063109487

I wonder if these scholars are still critical?  This is the stuff of adventure reporting and one in which journalists like to romanticize  it in the press. Egypt’s tourism is at an all time low with its political climate so these discoveries  along with the media  could be just what the country needs to boost its tourism. We see that Micol’s discovery and the later ones by  archaeologists have made headlines. A basic Google search  shows  the Daily Mail, Fox News and BBC to have covered it.

I was astounded when i first read about Michol’s findings in an article from news.com.au . Infact i nearly fell off the  chair at my university library.  I always thought that the existing  pyramids in Egypt  were the only ones. Its hard for my mind to comprehend how such large structures including now cities and tombs can be hidden underneath the sands for so many centuries undiscovered.

Then again Egypt is a land of severe sand storms that have covered up many of its treasures. According to some archaeologists there is still over 80% of undiscovered finds. In 1914 a whole expedition of  48 British explorers  vanished in a sand storm in the desert never to be found.

Smaller mounds found by Ms Micol still measure up to 330 feet across

Another Google Earth image of supposed pyramids taken from Daily Mail

Giza Pyramids taken from all-informationz.blogspot

Google Earth and satellite imagery in general  are powerful technologies initially used by governments and military  to locate enemy structures  and assist  with spying. Now they are available to many people like archaeologists  as well as reporters  who make use of them for their stories. I believe these technologies will aid archaeological discoveries in this decade.

Extra info;

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Categories: Egypt Archaeology | Tags: | Leave a comment

Google Earth discovers new Pyramids ?

Giant 'pyramid'

Google earth image of supposed pyramid taken from news.com.au

Mounds of sand spotted in the Egyptian desert using Google Earth could be the site of long lost pyramids. In 2012  American researcher Angela Micol  announced that  new and undiscovered pyramids were in the Egyptian desert.  She claimed that through using Google earth she found these pyramids. http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/more-pyramids-uncovered-by-google-earth-search/story-e6frfq80-1226449900356

Her findings  were met with much criticism by scholars  who dismissed the images as nothing more than anomalies and wind formed sand formations. Since then American archaeologists have used satellite imagery to discover 17 buried pyramids in Egypt as well as a thousand tombs and 3000 buildings from the time of the Pharaohs.  http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/american-archaeologists-discover-17-buried-pyramids-in-egypt/story-e6frfq80-1226063109487

I wonder if these scholars are still critical?  This is the stuff of adventure reporting and one in which journalists like to romanticize  it in the press. Egypt’s tourism is at an all time low with its political climate so these discoveries  along with the media  could be just what the country needs to boost its tourism. We see that Micol’s discovery and the later ones by  archaeologists have made headlines. A basic Google search  shows  the Daily Mail, Fox News and BBC to have covered it.

I was astounded when i first read about Michol’s findings in an article from news.com.au . Infact i nearly fell off the  chair at my university library.  I always thought that the existing  pyramids in Egypt  were the only ones. Its hard for my mind to comprehend how such large structures including now cities and tombs can be hidden underneath the sands for so many centuries undiscovered.

Then again Egypt is a land of severe sand storms that have covered up many of its treasures. According to some archaeologists there is still over 80% of undiscovered finds. In 1914 a whole expedition of  48 British explorers  vanished in a sand storm in the desert never to be found.

Smaller mounds found by Ms Micol still measure up to 330 feet across

Another Google Earth image of supposed pyramids taken from Daily Mail

Giza Pyramids taken from all-informationz.blogspot

Google Earth and satellite imagery in general  are powerful technologies initially used by governments and military  to locate enemy structures  and assist  with spying. Now they are available to many people like archaeologists  as well as reporters  who make use of them for their stories. I believe these technologies will aid archaeological discoveries in this decade.

Extra info;

 

Categories: Egypt Archaeology | Leave a comment

Tutankhamun

King Tut taken from Daily Mail

No blog of adventure reporting would be complete i feel without a mention of King Tutankhamun’s discovery in 1922. This was not only one of the biggest archaeological discoveries of the 20th century but also one of the most media covered archaeological discoveries. Thousands of newspaper and radio reports were produced from all over the globe. The Daily Telegraph and The Times in London published some of the most beautiful pictures of the King and his objects. They made front page news in England. Journalists covering the story would have experienced  real adventure reporting.

If time travel was possible i would love to be present at the moment of Tut’s discovery on the late afternoon of  4th of  November 1922 and also later on during the following weeks. The atmosphere with  so many of the world’s media presence would have been so electrically charged.

Just think about the excitement  and anticipation a reporter would have experienced. In my imagination  i can see a male reporter in 1920’s clothing holding a black and white camera taking snaps of objects that hadn’t seen the light of day for 3, 000  years. This would be a moment you would never forget in your reporting career.  Its a shame i think that to the best of my knowledge there exists no formal documentation of the reporter’s experience on site. There is a lot written for Carter and his team in countless biographies about the moment of discovery. The following video contains archival footage of Tut’s discovery http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZWB5-aXMXQ  has archival footage.

1922 Newspaper showing Tut taken from Tour Egypt

It has been recorded that reporters followed Carter around as if he was a film star. They were wanting to cover new angles on the story along with wanting to be given a tour and souvenirs of the site. I strongly believe  Carter  utilised the journalists to his advantage in gaining media coverage and permanent fame. Through this coverage the reporters romanticed him and his discoveries. Some archaeologists believe the so called curse of the pharaoh was coined by a reporters on site one day and Carter exploited it.  It certainly worked as so many people associate the curse of the pharaohs with him and his discovery.

Other archaeologists  believe that Carter invented the curse to gain more fame and the journalists adopted it religiously to make headlines. Whatever the case may be the curse became almost as big as the discovery itself.

One of the first pictures reporters took of the discovery taken from Alastair Beach Blog

Original photo of Carter and workers inside Tut’s tomb from Tour Egypt

Gerald O’Farrell author of ‘The Tutankhamun Deception’ argues that prior to 1922 the general public weren’t really interested in archaeology as it was seen as a dry and esoteric  subject. Then came king Tut and it changed everything. People were buying newspapers more just to read about Tut. According to O’Farrel the American media was obsessed with Tut and journalists did everything they could to exaggerate the story to make the story more attractive. They really  put Egypt and Tut on the map. They also gave rise to ‘Tut’Mania, an obsession with all things Egyptian by westerners. I think this mania still   exists to a degree as there are countless people around the world obsessed with the Ancient Egyptians. Journalism can really influence the collective consciousness of people.

Original Guardian newspaper pic of carrying objects out of the tomb taken from Static

Tut’s death mask in Cairo museum taken from Wikipedia

Categories: Egypt Archaeology | Leave a comment

Egyptian archaeology

Excavating tomb of the Physician in Egypt taken from Art Newspaper

Entrance to Egyptian tomb from jillkiefer.blogspot

Egypt has always been a mecca for archaeology and as a result over the centuries journalists from all over the world have covered it in their reporting of discoveries. Most stories of this archaeology have been highly romanticised in the papers and on television.

 

 

The Western media i think has sensationalised  Egyptian archaeology.  Growing up i remember most stories of  finds in Egypt were highly dramatised. I didnt mind, infact it fuelled my passion even more for archaeology.  Generally  i would never read the newspapers unless archaeology featured in it. It was Egypt  that made news. In storage i have a lot of these stories in newspaper clippings as im a hoarder of paperwork.

I still remember one late sunny afternoon in 1998 my English teacher  at Preston Girls Secondary College giving me a page from the Herald Sun  about the anniversary of king Tutankhamun’s discovery.  I think i must have read it about five times that afternoon going over information not wanting to miss anything. I know i still have this clipping at home but currently cant locate it due to so many things being in boxes because of renovation and painting.

One day i will find it and no doubt it will  have a yellowish tint to it as all newspaper clippings with age get this.  Now that so many newspapers are going online this clipping is even  more important. The future of all archaeological reporting not just Egypt will be online. If you do a Google search for journalism and archaeology in Egypt you get many headlines.

Media surrounding Egyptian archaeologist Zahi Hawass

When it comes to media exposure of Egyptian archaeology Dr. Zahi Hawass featured in the above and below images definitely had the  upper hand with being the most famous archaeologist in Egypt for well over a decade. Due to a corrupt regime under President Mubarak  Hawass had constant access to all the famous sites. Other archaeologists were denied this privilege. Its been  suggested that he had this privilege because of bribes initiated between himself and the regime.

Now with the regime gone he has been taken off his pedestal. I couldn’t be happier as i was so sick and tired for years watching him on television presenting and being interviewed by western journalists.  Hundreds of journalists from all over the world would have had to deal with him and him only to get access to many sites and interviews for stories. Biases would have formed.  One positive thing i can say about Hawass is that he was very passionate about his work and promoting Egypt to the rest of the world.  When a lot of people think of Egyptian archaeologists  im sure they think of him. He reinforced for years  the romantic image of Indiana Jones and archaeology.  He was a very sensationalist type of person that was  perfect for western media portrayals of  archaeology.

Zahi Hawass with mummy taken from Dalje com

EXTRA INFO

http://www.iol.co.za/scitech/science/discovery/how-mag-got-inside-scoop-on-ancient-egypt-1.1599621#.UnisNuKMWSo

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/The-Rise-and-Fall-and-Rise-of-Zahi-Hawass-208348331.html#Pyramid-Scheme-Zahi-Hawass-and-Giza-murals-1.jpg

Categories: Egypt Archaeology | Leave a comment

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